Mixed Review

IMG_0123

Mixed feelings on The Last Jedi.

On the one hand, it had character development, humor and engaging set pieces. We learn more about Kylo Ren and how he emerged. We learn more about Rey, her deep feeling of abandonment, and her quest to learn more about her parents. We see the leadership and command of Leia. We meet Luke again, and see how he has become cynical, closed off from everyone and everything, even the Force. We continue to see the stories of other characters – Finn, Poe, Gen. Hux, BB-8 – and some new characters introduced – Gen. Holdo, Rose, Paige the Codebreaker, etc. Many of the new characters were women, thus continuing to add balance to the gender ratio of the series.

There were also unexpected flashes of humor scattered throughout the movie, moments providing welcome breaks from the story line of conflict, pain, and death. Poe talking to Hux. Luke being handed his light saber. Luke and Rey. Poe at different times. Finn and Rose. These felt refreshing and new.

Finally, the set pieces of space battles and personal combat, were also breathless and riveting, continuing the tradition of previous Star Wars movies. The arc of the Luke’s story was resolved in a moving manner. And the presence of Leia was touching, knowing as we do, that she will not return in Episode IX.

On the other hand there were superfluous characters, some slow scenes, and particularly egregious story holes. Porgs and the caretakers on Skellig felt cutesy and out of place. The scenes on Canto Bight also teeming with characters, all wearing tuxedoes, didn’t seem to make sense. For a while, in the middle, the story slowed down, with exposition and back and forth. Finally, there were big story holes – Leia in space, the lack of background on Snoke, Snoke’s monologuing and his sudden death despite being so powerful, Luke’s lack of understanding of the importance of the Force texts, and Luke’s presence at the end, both physical and ethereal. These seemed too convenient and didn’t seem to fit the Star Wars canon.

So the movie was enjoyable, but I wouldn’t call it a classic like The Empire Strikes Back.

Frustration And Success

This is the story of the visa applications for India, for my parents through Cox and Kings Global Services (CKGS), San Francisco.

My parents recently became US Citizens, and having been in the US for almost a year, wanted to go back to India. However, a US Citizen requires a tourist visa to visit India. Since my parents were previously citizens of India, and India does not allow dual citizenship, they also had to renounce their Indian citizenship. The Indian Embassy and Consulates in the US (including San Francisco) do not allow direct access to visa applicants – all visa and other applications are handled through an outsourcing company, CKGS.

The CKGS website is poorly designed and did not address my question – How do I apply simultaneously for Renunciation of Indian citizenship and a Tourist Visa? I called the phone number several times, only to alternate between a busy signal, or a 15 minute wait time that required me to keep pressing a button on my phone keyboard, to continue to be connected. Once I reached a person, and explained my situation, I was told that the website “widget” would allow me to do that. Also, that I could send in the both the Renunciation application and Visa application in a single envelope.

I couldn’t figure out the CKGS widget. I also couldn’t find how to send both Renunciation and Visa applications in a single envelope. Filling out the Visa application was very complex – it required a handoff from the CKGS site to the Indian Embassy site, and then back again to the CKGS site. It took me 2 days to assemble the full paperwork. I also couldn’t get a timely appointment for a personal visit to submit the application at CKGS, so I submitted four separate applications via courier for my parents – 2 applications for Renunciation, and 2 applications for Visas.

The CKGS tracking system showed receipt of the Visa applications, but for Renunciation indicated that the Indian Passports were missing. That stumped me, since I had sent the passports in the courier envelopes. So I made my first trip to the CKGS office in San Francisco to see if I could sort this out.

I met with Jennifer at CKGS reception. Jennifer patiently heard my situation and then went into the back office to find out what had happened to the passports. After a couple of clarifications, she finally located the passports. CKGS staff had opened the Visa applications and seen the reference to the Renunciation applications, but did not see the Indian passports (for Renunciation) in the Visa application. So they marked the Renunciation applications as missing documents. Jennifer found the Fedex envelopes for Renunciation with the missing passports, so the applications could proceed. I requested Jennifer to confirm that all the documents were in order for Renunciation – in case something was missing, I could provide it right then, since I was already in their office.

Jennifer came back after an hour and told me that all four applications had been checked and were complete – there was nothing more for me to do. So I left the CKGS office. Later that evening, I again checked the CKGS tracking system. This time the CKGS tracking system said that I was missing a document. I needed to provide a notarized letter stating that my parents were staying at my address in the USA – one letter per application.

I drafted the letter, and then got all four copies notarized over the weekend. Then I made a second trip to the CKGS office in San Francisco. This time I met Gregory at the front desk. I explained the situation to Gregory, who took the letters and added them to the applications. I asked Gregory if my application was now complete and would be forwarded to the Indian Consulate for processing. He replied that they would leave for the Indian consulate later that day.

Two days later, the CKGS website indicated that they were still awaiting the notarized letter to complete the applications. I made a third trip to CKGS. Fortunately, I met Gregory again, who recognized me from my last visit. I asked him what had happened to the applications – why were they still showing missing documents. Gregory went back and checked. Apparently the applications were complete, but were sitting in the inbox for processing by CKGS staff. Gregory said that he pulled out the applications and specifically requested the staff member to process the application. He assured me that the applications would leave the CKGS office that day.

The next day, the application status had been updated as complete and on the way to the Indian Consulate. The turn around time to get the visas at the Indian Consulate was just one day. One day more for receipt and processing by CKGS, then the weekend, and finally one more day for delivery by Fedex.

Total time to get visas for India – 2 1/2 weeks. Total trips to CKGS, San Francisco – Three.

My recommendations for others who are in a similar situation:

  1. Personally visit the CKGS office via an appointment to hand in your visa application. This will ensure a complete application, or at least let you know what is missing, and allow you to provide those documents.
  2. Prepare to visit the CKGS office in San Francisco, if you send in your application by courier. Calling the help numbers on the CKGS website is useless, since the call center is in India and they have no knowledge of the specific situation at an office in the USA.
  3. Leave enough time for this entire process to have hiccups. You will be very stressed if you have already bought your tickets (like we did) and don’t have your visas in hand.

The whole process was very stressful and frustrating, but this was the view at the end. Yay!!

Airport - 1

Meltdown in Snow

“Get away from me! GET AWAY FROM ME!!”

The voice was loud, angry and quivering with emotion. I turned around on my skis to see what was going on. There it was – a snapshot of a domestic distress at the entrance to the ski lift in Park City, UT.

The woman had two small children clutching each of her legs. She was crying. Both children were crying. Their skis were lying haphazardly on the ground around them. Her partner was standing 3 feet away, gesturing as if he wanted to help, but being told to stay away.

The meltdown of self control that typically happens in the privacy of our homes, away from prying eyes, was happening in front of the transfixed crowd.

“GO AWAY! GO AWAY!!”, she continued yelling at him. Everyone paused to see what he would do. He stood there, looking at her. Her hands tried to comfort the two sobbing children. “Don’t touch me! I don’t want you here! GET AWAY”, she shouted, ignoring the crowd, her eyes flashing at him.

What had snapped her reserve? With two small children, they had to have been together for several years. How long had this been going on?  Or was it just a bad day due to the accumulated stress of the ski vacation – flights and cars, a new hotel room, getting the children dressed, the heavy boots, the cold weather, the falls of beginning skiers?

No one dared intercede. The woman shuffled over with her children to a bench at one of the outdoor tables. Tears were still streaming down her face as she hugged them. At that moment, my skiing group showed up from their run. I left with my group into the anonymity of the lift lines, leaving her sitting on that bench.

For the rest of that day, the woman and her situation were on my mind. Except for the public loss of self control, perhaps we have all been in her shoes. Memories of times where anger, frustration, fatigue, loss, misunderstanding, rejection, or unfulfilled expectations, have led to yelling and screaming. Not our proudest times, but these signs of pain and suffering are what make us human.

On that day, I wished that she and her family could find calm and peace, and I continue to wish for a better future for them.

 

 

 

Less Than Perfect

 

 

By © Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9576892

Wabi-sabi: Accepting transience and imperfection

What happens when you are not the best you can be with someone you love?

This evening, while driving N home, I asked if he had spoken to his coach about missing practice, like I had asked him to do. N replied that he had, but in his own way, leaving out what I felt was an important detail.

The frustration of a long day caught up with me. With a raised voice, I pointed out, where, several times in the recent past, N hadn’t done exactly what I had asked him to do. By the time I finished, N had tears in his eyes.

I remember a Q&A session at a meditation retreat. I asked the monk how I could protect my children from hurt and suffering, since I am not with them during most of their day. The monk replied that I couldn’t save anyone else from suffering. I could only save the person I was with 24 hours a day – myself.

Not only had I not protected N, I had contributed to his distress. I had modeled a focus on missing details, instead of complimenting N on his independence in talking to his coach. I had demonstrated how to carry troubles of the past, unresolved conversations, unfinished tasks, anxiety for the future, all the disappointments of the day; I had illustrated how to unload this ammunition onto an unsuspecting loved one.

After I apologized to N, because of his big and generous heart, he accepted my heartfelt apology.

But I carried the disquiet of my behavior into the evening. How to forgive oneself?

First, with acceptance of the hurt from my thoughtless words to my son.

Second, by letting go of the deep regret I felt for the way I had behaved.

Third, by resolving to be more mindful and in the moment, by not carrying the burden of a frustrating day into my next conversation.

Finally, by accepting that I am less than perfect, human, still a work in progress.

 

A Small Beginning

A game in progress

Game

When starting something new, I hear so many voices in my head:

  1. Will I fail?
  2. Will it be hard?
  3. What if I do it wrong?
  4. What if it is not good enough?
  5. And the big one – What will others think?

It has taken me a long time, and I am still a work in progress, but I have developed an approach for such questions.

The approach is to start with a small beginning and think of it as a game.

A game has goals, rules and feedback, which can also be applied to a task in our lives. But a game downplays and sidesteps questions like those above. In a game, if you fall over, you get another chance. If you die, you get a new life. If you hit an obstacle, you get another attempt. Because dealing with failure is built into the mental framework of the game, I find that I can sidestep the critical mind that raises questions.

This is similar to meditation. During meditation the instruction is let your thoughts arise and pass without any judgment. Similarly, a game calls for no judgment as you play. Without any judgment, everything becomes easier.

Still a work in progress, but with a new and hopeful approach.

 

Habit vs. To-do

A human being sitting in Meditation

Meditation

For a long time, I struggled with creating a meditation habit. I would meditate consecutively for a week, at different times during the day. Then I’d miss a day of meditation due to a change in my routine. Perhaps it was a late evening, or travel, or a day that wasn’t great. The one day missed would turn into two, and then three, and I’d struggle to create a chain of days meditated.

I had read that 21 days was a myth, and that creating a habit takes much longer. I had also read about the parts of a habit – the cue, reward, routine. I also knew all the benefits of meditation. Despite knowing all this intellectually, I still struggled with the practice of meditating daily.

On some days, I would meditate in the morning, just after I woke up. On other days, I would meditate before going to bed. I had set a reminder alarm, yet I would ignore the notification when it popped up on my phone.

If I missed my morning slot, I would run through my other daily activities, and then try to check off my daily meditation at the end of the day, before going to bed. There were days when I was so tired that sitting was easy to skip. On other days, if I didn’t have the 20 minutes I thought I “should” sit for, I would convince myself that I should miss it, since I wasn’t doing it right. It was a daily struggle.

Then I read a post (perhaps here – I don’t remember), that helped me make sense of my struggle. Instead of a creating a habit with an automatic trigger, I had put meditation on my daily to-do list – as in I have to meditate sometime today. As the day went on, my desire to sit was overcome by the daily schedule, or by tiredness, and it didn’t happen.

But by not seeing meditation as a to-do daily list item, instead as a commitment to a habit, meant I had a different sense of urgency when the notification appeared on my phone. I knew I had to drop everything and do it right now. A small tweak in thinking, but it had a big impact on me.

So – 25 consecutive days and counting…..